Poll: I use ...
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... the right editor for the right job. 8 29.63%
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Using different editors for configuration and actual development... - Programming On Unix

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jkl
Long time nixers
Last week, while accidentally witnessing one of those usual vi/Vim/Emacs/nano/ed discussions, I noticed that I probably have a weird setup: I do most of my actual development work with one editor while using another editor for configuration and similar short files. The advantage (to me) is that I prefer a comfortable, not necessarily small and fast environment for programming while editing configuration (etc.) files should just be quick.

As the majority of editor wars revolve around people preferring only one editor for just about anything, I'm curious if I'm having an unusual mindset or if we live in a two-editors world indeed.
0wl3x
Members
I do the same. I use vim anytime I am in the console and have a config file to look at & edit. When I am writing code for a project I always use my version of emacs. It seems more practical to me to use something that's less fully featured but faster and lightweight when editing something I know I am only going to have open for a few seconds, /etc/hosts for example.
venam
Administrators
(05-01-2017, 11:43 AM)jkl Wrote: As the majority of editor wars revolve around people preferring only one editor for just about anything, I'm curious if I'm having an unusual mindset or if we live in a two-editors world indeed.
For almost everything I use vim.
But vim sucks at clipboard handling even with a wrapper/plugin.
Sometimes for copying big chunks of text I use another editor, geany.

Also, when it comes to certain languages, I prefer writing things directly in the place where they are going to be executed/tested.
0wl3x
Members
(05-01-2017, 01:07 PM)venam Wrote: Sometimes for copying big chunks of text I use another editor, geany.

Venam, do you add any plugins to geany? Is it just regular from the GNU distribution?
venam
Administrators
(05-01-2017, 03:44 PM)0wl3x Wrote: Venam, do you add any plugins to geany? Is it just regular from the GNU distribution?
Vanilla vim and vanilla whatever else.

Maybe just a colorscheme change and vimbling( https://github.com/ivyl/vim-bling/ ) for fanciness.
That way I stay comfortable even when editing files remotely, which is useful at work.

I wasn't even knowledgeable about the fact that geany had plugins.
0wl3x
Members
(05-01-2017, 04:16 PM)venam Wrote: Vanilla vim and vanilla whatever else.

Okay cool. I use vanilla vim and a heavily modified version of emacs.
(05-01-2017, 04:16 PM)venam Wrote: I wasn't even knowledgeable about the fact that geany had plugins.
I don't know if geany has plugins either but then again I've never met a person who has used it for development!
acg
Members
I personally use NeoVim for everything. Is the one I feel comfortable with and don't have any reason to switch from it, yet. Try to convince me tho.
argonaut · musician · developer · writer · https://www.betoissues.com
jkl
Long time nixers
I saw that NeoVim, while having an interesting plug-in system (yay, Common Lisp!), features a couple of features which found their way back into the original Vim, including "jobs". But trying to convince someone of a different editor will probably lead to very unfriendly discussions, so no, I won't.

(Disclosure: I stopped using Vim.)
rocx
Members
Emacs shoulders 99% of my text-editing needs and then some. "And then some" because I haven't written a line of code in a long time outside of prose, so ERC, Magit, pass, Calc, Woman, and a butt-ton of other front-ends see more light. When a few commands need to be tinkered and I can't be bothered to open a shell buffer, a terminal window cracks open and runs a few things. nvi does a few minor configuration changes.

SSHing? TRAMP, mate.
pranomostro
Long time nixers
I use sam (sam.cat-v.org) for serious text editing, and ed for commit messages and really short editing tasks in small files. Copy-paste in both of them is quite a pain, but I got used to it.
hades
Long time nixers
Favorite editor all the time, which of course, means vim...

v i m


I use a special web-based editor for github markdown but that's different I guess.

Oh, and I do use visudo in one specific use case, which I'm sure you can guess.
apk
Long time nixers
ever since i started using bsd i've returned to my one true love and the only piece of software worth using which just coincidentally happens to be a text editor (in all senses) and that piece of software is of course acme
josuah
Long time nixers
People talking together of how they use Vim along with Emacs, or only one of them, or sam, or acme, or other, even open to gtk-based editors... Without flaming.

That is beautiful!

For now, I vim, I used to Emacs, I will nvi, vis, iode, edna, vi or neovim perhaps some day?

What I particularly like are programs that use "$EDITOR" and "$PAGER" rather than their own half baked editor.

There is mail(1), from which the convention is from iirc, but also dvtm(1) (5 153 lines of code) using $EDITOR to copy and $PAGER to scroll, unlike tmux (49 325 lines of code) which has both built-in. I can't blame tmux as it is still pretty neat.
jkl
Long time nixers
^ edna is sweet, I planned to write something like that from scratch because there is no native ed for Windows (only the GNU port). Yeah, time saved! Bookmarking, thanks.
dab
Members
Most of the time using vim, sometimes spacemacs. Trying to grokk vis :)
0wl3x
Members
@dab
Spacemacs is great. Have you been using evil mode? If yes, how do you like it?
Tmplt
Long time nixers
I tend to use (neo)vim for everything. I'm far from efficient at it though: I have a lot of installed plugins I've yet to use and I only use hjkl, $, 0, G and gg for file navigation (once every blue moon I'll actually use { and } to move between paragraphs/code blocks).
dab
Members
@0wl3x yes, choose it because of evil mode. Actulally I like integration of different emacs plugins like magit, helm and others with evil mode. But it's rare used lately, mostly vim with fzf and git integration.
strang3quark
Members
It depends, I use vim for almost everything but sometimes I need to work with Java (Android) and there's no point in using vim for that.
josuah
Long time nixers
strang3quark: I blame these programming language and programing environment that require something as heavy as eclipse to run.

This is the list of repositories required to build all eclipse features: https://git.eclipse.org/c/

The number of lines of the source of this page is twice what is needed to make a minimal text editor like kilo.

Wow! This editor has even more GitHub stars than lines of code!
pranomostro
Long time nixers
(06-01-2017, 03:05 AM)apk Wrote: ever since i started using bsd i've returned to my one true love and the only piece of software worth using which just coincidentally happens to be a text editor (in all senses) and that piece of software is of course acme

Calling that wannabe window manager an editor is at least madness, maybe even lovecraftian horror. acmefs is pretty nice though.
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
vis has become my main editor for monthes now. It is simple and fast enough for things as simple as editing a 3 lines config file. The default config is sane enough as well, so no need to tiker with config files or keep track of them. I tend to use other editors as well, for different reasons:
  • vis - $EDITOR is set to it
  • vi - when vis is not available (so basically every remote machine I log into, be it mine or for work)
  • ed - for low-spec/really old machines, and when editing file remotely from my phone
  • redirections/heredoc - for when I just need to dump some content as-is into a file
  • leafpad - for times when using a mouse is easier
  • notepad++ - don't judge me too fast.
josuah
Long time nixers
(10-01-2017, 08:53 AM)z3bra Wrote:
  • notepad++


Sometimes, people have to code on MS Windows at work. Sometimes they use Visual Studio. Sometimes, they use notepad++.
jkl
Long time nixers
I use Emacs for coding on MS Windows at work.
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
(10-01-2017, 12:55 PM)josuah Wrote: Sometimes, people have to code on MS Windows at work. Sometimes they use Visual Studio. Sometimes, they use notepad++.

My work machine is a windows machine. notepad++ is the simplest editor I've found on windows for my needs. Be it for reviewing SQL statements, viewing logs or whatever. If I need to "code" anything, I do that on my virtual machine.
I tried vim for windows, but it simply doesn't cut it.
hades
Long time nixers
(10-01-2017, 01:51 PM)z3bra Wrote:
(10-01-2017, 12:55 PM)josuah Wrote: Sometimes, people have to code on MS Windows at work. Sometimes they use Visual Studio. Sometimes, they use notepad++.

My work machine is a windows machine. notepad++ is the simplest editor I've found on windows for my needs. Be it for reviewing SQL statements, viewing logs or whatever. If I need to "code" anything, I do that on my virtual machine.
I tried vim for windows, but it simply doesn't cut it.

You should check out Atom by the folks at github, it's breddy gud

You could also check out Lime, a FOSS clone of Sublime Text. I've played around with it and really like it, but haven't used it on Windows
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
(10-01-2017, 09:42 PM)hades Wrote:
(10-01-2017, 01:51 PM)z3bra Wrote:
(10-01-2017, 12:55 PM)josuah Wrote: Sometimes, people have to code on MS Windows at work. Sometimes they use Visual Studio. Sometimes, they use notepad++.

My work machine is a windows machine. notepad++ is the simplest editor I've found on windows for my needs. Be it for reviewing SQL statements, viewing logs or whatever. If I need to "code" anything, I do that on my virtual machine.
I tried vim for windows, but it simply doesn't cut it.

You should check out Atom by the folks at github, it's breddy gud

You could also check out Lime, a FOSS clone of Sublime Text. I've played around with it and really like it, but haven't used it on Windows

Honestly, I would even use the plain notepad if it was not fucking up with unix line feeds... I'm really not akeen to learn a new "featurful" editor to use it as a simple note taker.
mrtn
Members
I'm not sure what to make of atom. In general, it's an okay-ish editor. But it takes so fucking long to startup on my work-pc... That alone is the reason, I'm sticking with Notepad++ for quick note-taking and small edits in config files... For programming I'm sticking mostly to IntelliJ (or Eclipse at work, because we have to...)
Wildefyr
Long time nixers
(05-01-2017, 01:07 PM)venam Wrote: For almost everything I use vim.
But vim sucks at clipboard handling even with a wrapper/plugin.
Sometimes for copying big chunks of text I use another editor, geany.

curious, i've always felt vim's register approach using "* and "+ was more than enough for copying from system clipboards. so much so that i dislike having to install xclip for neovim for the same functionality.
venam
Administrators
(12-01-2017, 09:26 AM)Wildefyr Wrote: curious, i've always felt vim's register approach using "* and "+ was more than enough for copying from system clipboards. so much so that i dislike having to install xclip for neovim for the same functionality.
I meant back and forth from vim to whatever else and from whatever else to vim.