Keeping Track of Your Things - Desktop Customization & Workflow
venam
I'm bumping this thread an idea that is closely in touch with the topic of keeping track of things, a knowledge base. Be it similar to offline documentation, cheat sheets or others.

It's sort of coming on and off in the tech news:
https://dnote.io/blog/how-i-built-person...or-myself/
https://blog.stephenwolfram.com/2019/02/...structure/

Some people are combining this with all sorts of tracking tools, heavily relying on them as an external memory or not (Extended mind sort of way).

So nixers, are you using any of these tools, are you building your own knowledge base and how?
z3bra
I have no idea how to track things. I use to write blog posts for that, but the idea of a blog post is to share knowledge with others.
At work I have a "howto" folder with random stuff, but it died as I don't take the time anymore to write things down.

I used shell scripts as documentation before, and it works great!
Unfortunately it doesn't work for ideas or concepts... I might start making "presentations" using sent(1), the suckless presentation tool, as the text format is simple amd it can include images.
Another idea would be a braindump gopherhole, which is simple as well, and can be accessed remotely.
pyratebeard
I started using vimwiki for taking notes in work. I created a git repo and combined that with gollum to serve it as a webpage which I can access from anywhere.
z3bra
My issie is that I wouldn't know how to organise stuff in a wiki. I think i just need a big greppable directory :P
pyratebeard
(01-03-2019, 07:33 PM)z3bra Wrote: I think i just need a big greppable directory :P

I use ag (the_silver_searcher) from within vim to search my wiki files.
z3bra
what's better in ag than the good old grep?
Also I don't use vim. My shell is too powerful to hide it behind such a rigid interface :P
venam
I've recently stumbled upon more people using blog or static site generators to create their knowledge base instead of stuff like zim or zeal or any personal wiki software.

This is quite interesting as I've said in a comment on lobste.rs I find myself searching on my own blog or own writing more often and reviewing it as a reminder, a sort of wiki. This isn't as quickly accessible as other solutions but it's still something.
fraun
(12-03-2019, 06:46 AM)venam Wrote: I find myself searching on my own blog or own writing more often and reviewing it as a reminder, a sort of wiki. This isn't as quickly accessible as other solutions but it's still something.

That's something I do all the time for my job - reading back through journal articles and papers (and my thesis) that I've written over the last few years. In much the same way as a blog post - they share information with others, but also act as a well written reminder of how to do things or how things work. (Although publishing papers is obviously not the easiest way to do this with the cost of publishing in open access journals reaching highs of £2000+, and the trauma of having them peer reviewed...)
thuban
Most of the time, i write "memos" in plain text file. I use grep or dmenu to find what I need later.
After a while, I write it on my website (a pseudo blog) to find them even when I'm away from home.
venam
The topic has resurfaced again, this time on lobste.rs: https://lobste.rs/s/utdgs1/what_is_good_...ng_desktop

I haven't gone through all the comments, I'll try to read everything and summarize the biggest ideas.




Members  |  Stats  |  Night Mode