GNU/Linux on the job - GNU/Linux
Pr0Wolf29
Has anyone used it as a work OS? I have a laptop that I've been running Arch on for a while, I used LibreOffice Spreadsheet program when I was a salesman. I use this laptop for school work too. I used it on the job when I had an IT job for documenting my work. These were basic tasks. Do you use it for your job? Maybe sysadmin?
venam
At work I'm running Ubuntu. I wanted to install Debian on the laptop but after a day of struggle trying to fix the wireless driver I gave up and installed Ubuntu.

I spend all my day in the terminal so it doesn't bother me that much.
What bothers me is the lack of *real* sloppy focus, the missing keybinds that I have in 2bwm, and how slow opening the dash menu can be.

Sometimes, I try to hold myself from hitting my laptop.

In my company, all the production servers are running on Red Hat Enterprise. I'm the only one in the company that dedicates his time to Unix which gives me an edge amongst developers and installers. I'm glad we aren't running any Windows servers!
strang3quark
When I was working I used Arch Linux in my work laptop, I only updated it on weekends.
ninjacharlie
I have Android on a tablet that I use at school. I use Google Docs on there, but since it's a rooted version of Android, I've also set up a chroot directory with Gentoo. I don't have a lot of stuff on it, but I can use Vim and a C compiler to get by without a full on desktop.

My main computer at home is an iMac 2013 (dual booting OS X and Archlinux). I use Arch for most of my day to day work, and only have OS X for compatibility with a few apps that don't have Linux versions.
dtnt
Yes. Main driver for my dayjob.
z3bra
(13-09-2015, 05:45 AM)Pr0Wolf29 Wrote: Do you use it for your job? Maybe sysadmin?

Exactly. I can't go away from windows because I need windows to troubleshoot our users' issues. But I have two monitors at work, one for windows (full screen hangout window), and one fullscreen Archlinux VM. Needless to say I spend 90% of my time on the VM screen (powered by ratpoison + a lot of personnal notifications scripts/status bar and shit for everything. I mostly have only two windows: tmux + dwb.
darthlukan
Yep. I now work in a place where I have to write C# and .NET stuff, so I run Windows in a VM atop Arch Linux. Most of my work is in the host OS, I only perform builds and tests in the VM (since our codebase is not totally "mono compatible." Yet.
Github: https://github.com/darthlukan
CRUX Ports: http://ports.brianctomlinson.com
GPG: 3694569D
"We're all human, act accordingly." -- Me
venam
It's fabulous how people in this community find ways to cope with their OS restrictions at work.
Maybe we could get some tips from the persons who are forced to have to use another OS and how they manage their workflow (between *nix and the other OS).
darthlukan
(14-09-2015, 01:35 AM)venam Wrote: Maybe we could get some tips from the persons who are forced to have to use another OS and how they manage their workflow (between *nix and the other OS).

For me it's kinda simple: Setup the $PROJECTROOT as shared to the VM (it's an NTFS partition auto-mounted via fstab), spin-up the VM, work in the host, when it comes time to test/build/debug: switch to the VM's workspace and fire up Visual Studio. Everything else is done in the host OS (and mostly with vim).

I'm still learning my company's codebase, but once I've had a chance to fully grok the solution and csproj files to see what their build-steps are, I'll be looking into scripting the VM's startup to include the build and test steps so that I don't have to have it running and then be forced to click so much, then I can avoid using Visual Studio for anything but possibly debugging (VS's debugger really is great).

I haven't used Windows in any "primary" capacity, ever, so there's still a lot about it that I need to learn before my workflow can be properly tweaked to an ideal.
Github: https://github.com/darthlukan
CRUX Ports: http://ports.brianctomlinson.com
GPG: 3694569D
"We're all human, act accordingly." -- Me
neeasade
(13-09-2015, 03:45 PM)z3bra Wrote:
(13-09-2015, 05:45 AM)Pr0Wolf29 Wrote: Do you use it for your job? Maybe sysadmin?

Exactly. I can't go away from windows because I need windows to troubleshoot our users' issues. But I have two monitors at work, one for windows (full screen hangout window), and one fullscreen Archlinux VM. Needless to say I spend 90% of my time on the VM screen (powered by ratpoison + a lot of personnal notifications scripts/status bar and shit for everything. I mostly have only two windows: tmux + dwb.

What keybinds do you use to focus in your linux vm? I am in a similar situation at work currently(linux vm windows host) and my setup has vi-like keybinds, and if I press super + L I lock the computer - know of anyway to keep focus inside the vm maybe?(it's vmware player unsure if virtbox would have the same problem)

(13-09-2015, 04:31 PM)darthlukan Wrote: Yep. I now work in a place where I have to write C# and .NET stuff, so I run Windows in a VM atop Arch Linux. Most of my work is in the host OS, I only perform builds and tests in the VM (since our codebase is not totally "mono compatible." Yet.
The other day at work I was editing a c# project in terminal vim on linux with autocompletion/function lookup via YouCompleteMe and Omnisharp, and building with mono's xbuild. It felt so dirty, and so delicious.




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