z3bra
I still wonder how we could improve IPC on a system, by other means than text protocols.
I was reading some cyberpunk books this summer, and they all came with a different approach when it comes to the "interface of the future".

The most "common" one is a 3D which you can interact with just like you'd do in real life: handwrite notes, read paper sheets, etc... It has to be the most intuitive way to do computing, as there is no new skill to mastef while in the system. I suppose that programming in this environment is like doing mechanics in real life, closer to craftmanship.

Another interresting idea was neural plugs, so you could "feel" data streams, and process them dirrctly inside your brain. This gives you full power over the system as it becomes an extension of your brain, at the cost of putting you in danger (no need to explain why you'd be afraid of hackers...)

And last but not least: AI. Some authors simply rely on a robot that would do all the search for you, computing from a huge database where every document is archived. You then talk to this AI to find what you are looking for.

All of these would change computing drastically, so I wonder if, and when they would appear. The first one being the more plausible, seeing the hype with VR today, and the progress made in such direction
Steph
(02-12-2018, 06:06 AM)z3bra Wrote: handwrite notes, read paper sheets, etc... It has to be the most intuitive way to do computing

An example of this can already be seen in the shift from command lines to desktop environments.

The whole idea of a 'desktop' with file folders, was meant to mirror the real world business environment of desks and folders so that businessmen could better understand how to visualize what they were doing on a computer. Older computers were confusing beasts with punch cards, rolls of paper, flashing lights. Companies had to create something familiar for the computer illiterate.

It's crazy to think about that the entire direction of the computer has been changed because of design choices to make the barrier for entry lower.

I wonder if things would be drastically different now if efficiency and elegance were prioritized over ease of access and what that type of environment would look like. Would it even have a desktop?
twee
I doubt it. I think that at a pointing device would have become a thing at some point (hah), because it has applications that make it useful beyond just navigating a virtual desktop.

the route that plan9 took is a pretty good indication, i think. data and said data's flow is clearly prioritised. the mouse pointer is used pretty innovatively to further this goal (i thought a lot about whether acme would work without a mouse and think it would be clumsy)

i think that the desktop metaphor really helped in the drive away from dumb terminals. plan9 was designed to run on terminals, albeit graphical ones, and this is shown in the design (and i think that it is a damn good thing), but a desk is an inherently personal space, and in opening it up to non nerdy businesspeople, their expectations were pushed onto the product and the market was forced to conform to their views (admittedly by this point pcs were already a thing)
jkl
I don't think that all computers need to cater the needs of YouTube's target audience.
Steph
(05-12-2018, 06:53 AM)jkl Wrote: I don't think that all computers need to cater the needs of YouTube's target audience.

I wish there weren't any computers that catered to that audience.
This might be an unpopular opinion- but I really wish computers had remained text based and used for scientific and mathematical research.
We are seeing today a generation (which I myself am not separate from) of university students with 0 attention span, from a lifetime of electronic media abuse.
mrtn
(05-12-2018, 10:14 AM)Steph Wrote: We are seeing today a generation (which I myself am not separate from) of university students with 0 attention span, from a lifetime of electronic media abuse.

Which is not a technology problem but a people problem. If humanity would not be chasing 'likes' or dumb distraction, scrolling through endless social media feeds, this would not be a problem.
z3bra
Question is, why are they interrested in that?
jkl
People need distraction from other people, they always did.

Sixty years ago, parents were warned that their children read too much which was said to make them less social. Then the radio came. Then the TV came. Then YouTube and Spotify came. Their computer is just a temporary "TV replacement" until the next distraction device is invented.
Steph
(06-12-2018, 08:44 AM)mrtn Wrote: Which is not a technology problem but a people problem. If humanity would not be chasing 'likes' or dumb distraction, scrolling through endless social media feeds, this would not be a problem.

Are you asking humans not to be humans?
We crave such things and always have. Tech companies have turned these cravings into a business model.
Steph
(06-12-2018, 09:45 AM)jkl Wrote: Their computer is just a temporary "TV replacement" until the next distraction device is invented.

I agree with you in principal but I think its hard to equate the distracting power of a book to say, a cellphone.




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