Native Linux Experiment [Kyocera Rise C5155] - Android & Iphone
GSlayerBrian
I was going to ask this question in the IRC, but seeing as it's down, you folks have very craftily succeeded in getting me signed up here :D

The Experiment:

I would like to know if it is possible to install Linux/BSD/any modern unix variant natively on an Android device, either on the device's internal storage or the SD card (or both).

I understand that it is possible with some phones, and may not be easily achievable on others.

I have a Kyocera RIse C5155 that I am prepared to risk bricking in the name of exploration to see if this can be done. If I can get a console and wifi connectivity working natively, I'll be happy.

Preferably, I'd like to put Debian ARM on the handheld because I have the most experience with Debian, but any modern unix/unix-like distribution would be an achievement as far as this experiment goes.

If anybody could tell me where to begin, or offer any insight, I'd greatly appreciate it.
venam
Seems really interesting. I was also wondering how people can do that.
Someone here installed linux on his calculator. Taking that into consideration I think that it would be more simple to install it on a phone then a calc.
I'm looking forward to the answers.
marcusant
First your going to want to see if you have USB OTG support. You then will need to use that to plug in a keyboard.

The issue now is that the normal ARM kernel most likely won't support your hardware and the android kernel you have most likely won't support normal ARM distributions.

The only device that I know can run Linux on naively is the Nexus 7 because the kernel and userspace are open source, the bootloader is easily unlockable (and can be used to install OS images), and the kernel works well with normal Linux distributions with little modification. I'm also assuming this is the same with the Galaxy Nexus and other Nexus services because of Ubuntu's phone project supporting them.

I'm not trying to be a salesperson here, but these types of things are why I buy Google phones that have mostly open source and well documented software and (usually) open hardware (ex. OMAP4 CPUs).
zygotb
I think the factor to consider is CPU architecture, and there are many embedded *nix variants which might be easily ported to an Android device, but I've never even rooted an Android device yet, so what do I know?
Someone doesn't appreciate my php generated image!
marcusant
(01-02-2013, 10:14 AM)29a Wrote: I think the factor to consider is CPU architecture, and there are many embedded *nix variants which might be easily ported to an Android device, but I've never even rooted an Android device yet, so what do I know?

ARM isn't very standardized
CrossFold
If you want to install linux, you can get ArchLinux on your phone. The thing is, it does not wipe your Android, but installs as a virtual machine. Not sure if anyone knew this before but there was an app called "ArchLinux installer" which could install it without any problems. I have no idea as to why the app was taken down though.

EDIT : You can keep up with a youtube channel "OpenSourceGangster". Not sure if people knew this one already. But just my input :)
ampharos
By VM you mean chroot. The main problem is making pure images for these devices is next to impossible, and if it isn't, it's not going to be good. Stick with hacky chroots for now.

Android isn't as open as you think.
benwaffle




Members  |  Stats  |  Night Mode  |  Help