Which BSD do you use? - BSD

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I recently started using OpenBSD and so far everything is great. Especially the support on my laptop. I love the fact that the devs of OpenBSD care about security/privacy, which is a big plus for me and others.
jvarg
Members
I'm in the same boat, started using OpenBSD some weeks ago and working with it is great. I use it as my private OS and i'm very happy with it. The only thing i really miss is something like Virtualbox (with usable performance) to set up some linux dev boxes.
bsdkeith
Long time nixers
I'm a fairly recent convert to OpenBSD also, (systemd made me look elsewhere in case it takes over Linux).

I also use FreeBSD on machines that are not supported fully under OpenBSD, & have used GhostBSD.

What I particularly like is how small a basic installation is under OpenBSD, less than 1GB for Fluxbox with Firefox & Xmms. The same on FreeBSD comes in at around 1.8GB.

As is mentioned in another thread, OpenBSD comes with cwm & fvwm as standard, so offers a choice of wm out of the box. (I'm a long time user of Fluxbox so automatically install it.)

I must get around to trying out cwm. :)
(25-08-2015, 04:03 AM)jvarg Wrote: I'm in the same boat, started using OpenBSD some weeks ago and working with it is great. I use it as my private OS and i'm very happy with it. The only thing i really miss is something like Virtualbox (with usable performance) to set up some linux dev boxes.
You take a hit on performance by using OpenBSD, not terrible though.


(25-08-2015, 06:13 AM)bsdkeith Wrote: I'm a fairly recent convert to OpenBSD also, (systemd made me look elsewhere in case it takes over Linux).

I also use FreeBSD on machines that are not supported fully under OpenBSD, & have used GhostBSD.

What I particularly like is how small a basic installation is under OpenBSD, less than 1GB for Fluxbox with Firefox & Xmms. The same on FreeBSD comes in at around 1.8GB.

As is mentioned in another thread, OpenBSD comes with cwm & fvwm as standard, so offers a choice of wm out of the box. (I'm a long time user of Fluxbox so automatically install it.)

I must get around to trying out cwm. :)
How do you like FreeBSD/GhostBSD compared to OpenBSD? Also CWM is a neat window manager.
vypr
Long time nixers
I was using OpenBSD, then my stupid keyboard decided to not work.
Code:
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1
G d s+:++ a--- C++ UB P+ L+ !E !W+++ !N !o K--? w++ !O M++ !V PS+++ PE-- Y++ PGP+ !t !5 !X !R tv b+ DI D++ G e- h r y--
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

buddhist ~ esperantisto ~ communist
bsdkeith
Long time nixers
(25-08-2015, 01:54 PM)October Wrote: How do you like FreeBSD/GhostBSD compared to OpenBSD? Also CWM is a neat window manager.
Prefer OpenBSD. Just spent an hour with cwm last night, creating my .cwmrc file. Might use it, but it will be hard to change from 'my' Fluxbox. :)
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
cwm is the best WM I could find. It's light, fast, got tons of cool and useful features and is extensible with wmutils.
CWM is an amazing window manager. Will look into wmutils.

(26-08-2015, 06:09 AM)bsdkeith Wrote:
(25-08-2015, 01:54 PM)October Wrote: How do you like FreeBSD/GhostBSD compared to OpenBSD? Also CWM is a neat window manager.
Prefer OpenBSD. Just spent an hour with cwm last night, creating my .cwmrc file. Might use it, but it will be hard to change from 'my' Fluxbox. :)
You should definitely share that .cwmrc :D
bsdkeith
Long time nixers
It's just a rehash of one I found on line, very basic.
Code:
$ cat .cwmrc
# customize some bindings (C-control M-alt M1-button1)
bind M-r        exec
bind CM-r       reload
bind CM-l       label
bind CM-t       xterm -e "top -s 0.6"
bind CM-m       menusearch
mousebind M-1   window_move
mousebind CM-1  window_resize

# application menu
command xmms    xmms
command firefox firefox
command xpat2   xpat2
command xmahjongg  xmahjongg
command pysol  ./pysol
command mc    xterm -e mc
command viewnior  viewnior
command  gimp  gimp
command xcalc  xcalc
command xterm    xterm

# groups predefined, use xprop to get these from each program
#autogroup 2     Navigator,Firefox
#autogroup 3     pidgin
#autogroup 3     xchat
#autogroup 3     xterm,silc
#autogroup 4     xterm,mail

# inherit current selected group
sticky yes

Here is where I got it.
http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=article&s...0502141551
ChefIronBelly
Members
Currently use NetBSD/wmutils although I have used Free, Open as daily drivers and could be happy with any of them.
"The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose from." - Andrew S. Tanenbaum
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
I wish all people using wmutils could give us some feedback on how they use it and what their experience is
dkeg
Members
Sure! New thread? Chef and I have been working together getting our wm-utils dialed in. I had thought of opening a 'My workflow' type of thread in the bbq forums.
work hard, complain less
z3bra
Grey Hair Nixers
Bumping this thread as I've recently discovered the joy OpenBSD is. I've been a happy linux hacker for long, but I mist say it feels great to use a "fully-complete" OS that's ready to use right after install!

The philosophies behind Linux and BSD are quite different, but both are interesting, and I'm convinced our world need both!
josuah
Long time nixers
(17-07-2016, 07:12 PM)z3bra Wrote: [...] our world need both!

Maybe it is a paradox, but I feel that ^^this^^ is the way to get along with standards.

That is also why I really like projects built in portable C, or ported from BSDs to Linux (with libbsd?, or in the other direction, but I am running Linux right now).

GhostBSD may be my entrance door to BSD, as Ubuntu was for Linux: I was needing to see how a system can work while fully configured before to start setting up a new one on its own. But I have seen nixers starting with slackware as a first distro!
ChefIronBelly
Members
sshbio Wrote:is the way to get along with standards.

That cartoon has hung in my cubicle for years :)

Currently dual booting Free and Net. My Open is installed on a live usb via Fugulta, works like a charm.
"The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose from." - Andrew S. Tanenbaum
xero
Long time nixers
(18-07-2016, 03:43 PM)sshbio Wrote: But I have seen nixers starting with slackware as a first distro!

dont be like me. i used slack first as a kid, since that was *the linux distro* of the day. but it soured me to nix for years.
josuah
Long time nixers
Oh, Slackware being "the linux distro of the day"? I missed something!
xero
Long time nixers
(19-07-2016, 06:02 PM)sshbio Wrote: Oh, Slackware being "the linux distro of the day"? I missed something!

yea, i'm old. i installed it via a stack of floppies (seems like it was 50 of them!)
jkl
Long time nixers
If I ever have to choose a Linux again because someone pays me for that or something, I'll surely choose Slackware too. One of the last no-bullshit distros.
pranomostro
Long time nixers
Lots of people I respect really like Void Linux (chneukirchen, gottox, and some more).

Maybe it's also a non-bullshit distro.
jkl
Long time nixers
Void Linux, NixOS and Slackware are the three which come to my mind. Admittedly, NixOS is a different distro.
mushmouth
Members
OpenBSD is my most favorite one out there.
swathe
Members
I just started playing with OpenBSD. Enjoying it so far.
Tmplt
Long time nixers
I've been meaning to try BSD out. Now with me throwing a server out of spare parts into the hall at the university seems like a good starting point. I messed around with openBSD a bit, trying to get full disk encryption set up, but the disk labels eluded me. I also found out that I'm not able to run a Teamspeak server on it, so I'll try FreeBSD when I have my hands on it again. (I'd use mumble, course, but moving people is hard.)
jkl
Long time nixers
OpenBSD's encryption is damn easy to set up IMO. Can I help?
Tmplt
Long time nixers
When I get my hands on the system I'll try again. I'll be sure to ask you if I end up having problems.
Mafia
Long time nixers
OpenBSD. And OpenBSD.
drkhsh
Members
i started using openbsd on all my servers (mail, web, *dav, irc, xmpp) and i really enjoy it. in my opinion it is very well-engineered and clean. documentation is really great and helpful (you do not need google searches). additionally i like the community.
Mrat
Members
OpenBSD is my favourite. But in my actual laptop it doesn't support the network card.
So I used FreeBSD temporary before going back to Linux.
xcko
Members
openbsd right now, though I just learned there is no audio over hdmi suppport nor bluetooth. I don't use either of those, but just a heads up for anyone else considering it.