UNIX Diary - Psychology, Philosophy, and Licenses
vompatti
Dear Unix Diary,

couple days ago, while working on my VOIP system, I came to conclusion that python is too slow for the client side software so I started to do it in Go which I've been enjoying a lot. Such a nice language. Problem which I'm facing now is to send audio data over network (converting []int16 to []byte but encoding/gob seems to do the job). Can't wait to get this work. The server software seems to be pretty stable for now, haven't tested it with malicious data nor have I wrote any tests. Server has about 950 lines of code now but it doesn't have that much functionality though it can handle user authentication and do the UDP hole punch, it has simple control panel and it is _very_ easy to add stuff into it (to the control panel and other functionality for the clients).
pizzaroll1
Dear UNIX Diary,

I finally made the switch to Emacs completely (pkg_delete vim). I can't believe how much better Emacs is (for writing Haskell and C) than Vim is. Coding in REPL languages is very nice with Emacs, as you write the code, it is loaded into the REPL, so you can just switch buffers and play around with the code. Emacs Lisp is way better than VimScript, too, although it has its shortcomings. There's a project to replace the Emacs Lisp interpreter with the Guile interpreter (GNU project's Scheme dialect), which would be fantastic, since Guile is a reasonably modern language. I really need to get into writing more Lisp, I hear it's like nirvana once you "get" it.

I always hear the saying that Emacs is a good operating system without a good editor. Well clearly that's wrong, since evil-mode provides all of the features of Vim in Emacs, and the plethora of Emacs packages provide functionality that's impossible in Vim.

Now all that's left is to install webkit.el for browsing the web in Emacs, getting to grips with Gnus for writing/reading mail in Emacs and running Emacs as PID 1. Maybe that's a joke, maybe it isn't: I don't see why it wouldn't be fun to try to write an .emacs file that brings up the network, starts daemons, fscks the disk.....
my website: kaashif.co.uk
vypr
Deer µNix Diary

After wanting to get involved in game development, I decided to plunge into it. I remembered that kirby used SFML in his platformer so I found the official C bindings for it (it's C++ default), and tried my hand at it. Things went well until I noticed that CPU usage was around 80% and that energy usage was very high. So I moved to the Allegro game library, and the usages are low, like they should be. I pushed my test code onto GitHub.

http://github.com/thevypr/gamedev
Code:
-----BEGIN GEEK CODE BLOCK-----
Version: 3.1
G d s+:++ a--- C++ UB P+ L+ !E !W+++ !N !o K--? w++ !O M++ !V PS+++ PE-- Y++ PGP+ !t !5 !X !R tv b+ DI D++ G e- h r y--
------END GEEK CODE BLOCK------

buddhist ~ esperantisto ~ communist
kirby
(21-09-2014, 02:09 AM)vypr Wrote: Deer µNix Diary

After wanting to get involved in game development, I decided to plunge into it. I remembered that kirby used SFML in his platformer so I found the official C bindings for it (it's C++ default), and tried my hand at it. Things went well until I noticed that CPU usage was around 80% and that energy usage was very high. So I moved to the Allegro game library, and the usages are low, like they should be. I pushed my test code onto GitHub.

http://github.com/thevypr/gamedev

If you're not using C++, I would recommend SDL. It's C based and what I started learning with, which taught me a good deal about gamedev basics. I moved to SFML because I'm a big fan of Object Oriented and think it works really nicely for game development in general. There's a great tutorial for SDL here.

EDIT: I learned on SDL 1.x, no clue if 2.0 still feels like C or not. It is a C library still so in theory it should be.
venam
Dear Unix Diary,
The last two weeks I was busy with university and programming projects.
I haven't got time to do anything special Unix specific. I've learned Octave (Matlab-like), I'm reading my second Haskell book, I finished a meta-programming project, I finished reading a nice book about PostgreSQL and I'm still learning new things about it, I'm watching programming talks, I'm trying to finish the Ricerous project with the other members, and I'm working on my "website visual coherency framework" which consist of an add-on (done) and of a program that uses perceptual hash (pHash) to match images and output graphs/statistics about them.

I'm doing so much things but I feel hollow... I miss you Unix, I know you are more than grep, sed, rename, and find.
xero
dear unix diary,
as a cli junkie and a new recruit to the "cult of vim" i spend most of my time in the terminal. i've been using tiling window managers for a while now (currently running herbstluftwm) and usually have 5+ terminal windows open at time. because of this, i never really gave tmux much of a thought, but after this week, i'm a believer. a few different factors brought me to this revelation, all of them related to work. half our sites are written in nodejs, and require a frontend and a backend server; each of which i ran in a separate terminal. a spent lots of time resizing the pane and looking back through the buffer, but whenever a new "event" was fired urxvt/zsh would scroll back to the bottom *uggg!*. our other legacy sites are coded in php, and we develop them on a special test server. the server is a weird environment. i got our sysadmin in install zsh for me but lots of my keyboard presses were interpreted wrong. i tired running the zkbd, setting the $term var, nothing worked. finally, one of my co-workers (a pc users oddly enough) asked me if i'd tried tmux. i initially just brushed him off (*psh!* what's a windoze user know about nix warez?) but after a while i was getting super frustrated and decided to just give it a try. *ZOMFGBBQ!#@!~* like magic everything just seemed to work. using buffers for each node server is awesome, it's a lot more relaxed when it comes to scrolling back though history. combine it with an ssh ServerAliveInterval i can just toss my dev server connection in a buffer and forget about it until i need it. the configurable keybindings are great (i love making up my own styles). and it's copy paste features seems to work better than the urxvt-perls library i was using before. it's kinda vim style, i enter command mode (ctrl+a), press esc to enter selection mode, move around and find what i want to select, press V to start selecting, and press Y to yank it to the clipboard. once it's copied, i can use my normal paste (ctrl+v) anywhere. here's how that looks in my .tmux.config
Code:
# vim style copy paste mode
unbind [
bind Escape copy-mode
unbind p
bind p paste-buffer
bind-key -t vi-copy 'v' begin-selection
bind -t vi-copy y copy-pipe 'xclip -in -selection clipboard'
i really have only scratched the surface, having never used any of the splitting features, but i can say now i'm a believer.

*CLI-LIFE 4-LIFE*
cjm
Dear Unix Diary,

I am in my first year of college, and I am starting to get overwhelmed with work. I know my way around a Unix system and I am beginning to wonder how far a knowledge of Unix will get me. Overall I am enjoying the work, but as it is a Windows centric environment. I want it to be more unixy :).
----
blog: c-jm.github.io
twitter: https://www.twitter.com/_c_jm
My ambition in life is to be a graybeard by the time I am 65.
----
kirby
Dear Unix Diary,

Comparatively, the start of my University life has been the opposite. Lots of work yes, but I've had entire lectures on how to use mv, cp and rm, as well as an attached practical session. Everything here is Linux (some old Red Hat) but they assume I have no prior experience, making it pretty easy. The same goes for the programming part, all I need to learn there is Java syntax (eew). Big thanks to z3bra by the way for his blog post on using a Makefile for Java.
JerrySpringerIsMyDad
Dear Unix Diary,

Today, I decided that since I know almost nothing about python, I would write myself a "file manager" type thing with it. It is not easy at all, not everything works the way I want, everything is messy, and half the time I have no idea what I am doing. At this point I have something that kind of actually works, but it is pretty crude and doesn't do a whole lot. It is an interesting learning experience though, so I guess that's all that really matters. Right? I can share it with you guys if you want. I would really appreciate any tips you might have.
xero
@JerrySpringerIsMyDad yes exactly! i have tons of old programs i wrote that emulate other programs just to see if i could. keep hacking :D




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