nixers community git - Community & Forums Related Discussions
z3bra
A few heads up:
robotchaos
Can I put up my code I'm learning with? I know it wouldn't be fun for you guys to go through, but a place for me to store it and get familiar with git. Trying to be like you guys
z3bra
My first idea regarding this repo was to be for projects shared by community members, and not "personnal learning projects".
Not that I'm against the idea, but if everyone starts doing that, it might end up in a big mess of small abandonned projects.
That's only my opinion though, and this is the community git, so I don't have the last word on it.

If you want to get familiar with git, there is the motd.git repo which doesn't require anything more than common sense, and the ability to fit an ascii message in a 80 char wide file ;) Plus, you could hopefully see your motd when connecting via ssh if you're lucky enough! (/etc/motd is generated every 30 minutes by picking a random file in this repo)
robotchaos
That's a fair point. I wouldn't need the repo forever. I will keep my learning projects local and if they are ever ready to publish, then I will do so. No harm in this.

I mean I've used git privately for storing my pass repo and for my other coding projects. I was more so thinking of getting familiar with git collaboration. Pull requests, dev branches, etc. Which could all be done with that motd.git yes?
z3bra
(28-07-2017, 02:12 PM)robotchaos Wrote: That's a fair point. I wouldn't need the repo forever. I will keep my learning projects local and if they are ever ready to publish, then I will do so. No harm in this.

I mean I've used git privately for storing my pass repo and for my other coding projects. I was more so thinking of getting familiar with git collaboration. Pull requests, dev branches, etc. Which could all be done with that motd.git yes?

First of all, pull requests is bullshit. It's a fancy word github coined to name external contributions. The real pull request is:

- "Hey bob, I forked your project and added something, care to check it out?"
- "Sure Alice, I'm all excited!"
Bob then issue the following, to review, and merde Alice's code:
Code:
$ git checkout -b alice-fix
$ git pull git://alice.server.tld/project.git
$ git diff master
$ git checkout master
$ git merge alice-fix
$ git push origin ssh://bob.server.tld/var/git/project.git

What happened here? Alice requested Bob to pull her changes, to get them merged in the project.
An even simpler way to do that would have been to simply send a patch to Bob, so he could apply it.
But people want fame and glory more than working simplicity, so they create pull requests to get their avatar in a project history ;)

Basically, there's nothing more that push/pull to do on shared remote repositories.
robotchaos
Thanks for setting me straight on that. I thought that was the basic idea, but never collaborated with anyone, so was unsure.
pizzaroll1
Perhaps we could do something like what many projects do (e.g. OpenBSD, Linux, GNU, many many more) and have mailing lists for each project where people can send patches if they want them to be reviewed?

Actually I guess that is overkill, since we have a forum we could do that in. But I greatly support the practice of sending patches somewhere (forum, mailing list, wherever) and discussing them in public, where there will be a record of: what the patches were, how the review process changed the patches, what the discussion was etc. I think this is important for future contributors, so they can learn and make their contributions better.

Your example of Alice sending Bob patches is so simple you didn't even explain it, since it's trivially obvious what happens (they mail back and forth, Bob eventually is satisfied and applies the patches).

Recall that the Linux kernel is developed this way, so the tooling around emailing patches is excellent: look at git-send-email and git-am, for example. It sends the commit and applies it, preserving author, time data and GPG signatures too.

(Note: I am not specifically advocating for mailed patches, but just putting patches somewhere and talking about them as a group before applying them, at least for big patches adding lots of new functionality)
z3bra
The idea of a mail list is appealing to me as well, as you can also get notified of new commits/releases/projects on the repo
r4ndom
(01-08-2017, 09:33 PM)pizzaroll1 Wrote: Perhaps we could do something like what many projects do (e.g. OpenBSD, Linux, GNU, many many more) and have mailing lists for each project where people can send patches if they want them to be reviewed?
I like it! It makes getting involved in project a lot easier.
z3bra
I don't manage the nixers.net mail server though so we'll have to wait on venam for that. If needed, I can provide a temporary mail list with my own domain.

@venam, I'd vote for mlmmj for mail list handling. I can help you set it up if you want (it's insanely easy to do, really!).




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